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Id VisitTime IPAddress Area
23723951 2018-05-27 54.224.108.85 美国
23720875 2018-05-26 203.208.60.174 北京市
23713813 2018-05-26 203.208.60.174 北京市
23710859 2018-05-26 203.208.60.177 北京市
23709730 2018-05-26 54.36.149.69 美国
23704712 2018-05-26 203.208.60.223 北京市
23699761 2018-05-26 203.208.60.174 北京市
23696590 2018-05-26 203.208.60.178 北京市
23692579 2018-05-26 203.208.60.178 北京市
23689868 2018-05-26 40.77.167.6 美国
23689555 2018-05-26 203.208.60.176 北京市
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23682693 2018-05-26 203.208.60.174 北京市
23676150 2018-05-25 203.208.60.177 北京市
23671158 2018-05-25 203.208.60.176 北京市

Profile

 

Stijn van der Veen is professor in Microbiology and Assistant Dean at the Zhejiang University School of Basic Medical Sciences. He received his Ph.D. at Wageningen University, The Netherlands, where he worked on stress survival of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. He subsequently became postdoctoral researcher and lecturer at Wageningen University and investigated the mechanisms that L. monocytogenes employs to form biofilms and generate diversity. Afterwards he became research associate at the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology at the University of Oxford, UK, where he studied host-microbe interactions and vaccine development against Neisseria meningitidis. He has published over 30 papers in international high-impact peer-reviewed journals such as The Journal of Infectious Diseases, PLoS Pathogens, Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Infection and Immunity, International Journal of Medical Microbiology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA and Nature Reviewes Microbiology. His current research is focused on the mechanisms that Neisseria gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis employ to colonize the human host and cause disease and translate this knowledge to the development of vaccines and targets for intervention. His current research is focused on the mechanisms that Neisseria gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis employ to colonize the human host and cause disease and translate this knowledge to the development of vaccines and targets for intervention.

Research work

The group’s research is focused on 1) host-microbe interactions, 2) antimicrobial resistance, 3) novel antimicrobial development, and 4) vaccine development. This research fits in a long-term strategy to define mechanisms that bacterial pathogens employ to colonize the human host and cause disease and translate this knowledge to the development of vaccines and targets for intervention.